How DBS Works

 

  DBS Parkinson's Control Therapy

A surgically implanted dual-channel neurostimulator, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, delivers electrical stimulation to precisely targeted areas on each side of the brain. Bilateral stimulation of these areas controls the signals that cause the disabling bilateral motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) Therapy for Parkinson's Control is a surgical treatment proven to reduce some of the symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease (PD).1

How It Works
DBS uses a surgically implanted medical device, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, to deliver electrical stimulation to precisely targeted areas within the brain. Stimulation of these areas blocks the signals that cause the disabling motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. The electrical stimulation can be noninvasively adjusted to maximize treatment benefits. As a result, many individuals may achieve greater control over their body movements.

DBS System consists of three implanted components:
Lead – A lead consists of four thin coiled insulated wires with four electrodes at the lead tip. The lead is implanted in the brain.
 
Extension – An extension connects to the lead and is threaded under the skin from the head, down the neck and into the upper chest.
 
Neurostimulator – The neurostimulator connects to the extension. This small, sealed device, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, contains a battery and electronics. The neurostimulator is usually implanted beneath the skin in the chest below the collarbone (depending on the patient, a surgeon may implant the neurostimulator in the abdomen).
 
Sometimes called a "brain pacemaker," it produces the electrical pulses needed for stimulation.
These electrical pulses are delivered through the extension and lead to the targeted areas in the brain. The pulses can be adjusted wirelessly to check or change the neurostimulator settings.